Emergency Preparedness and Response

In light of recent disasters, acts of violence and pandemics, APAP’s field partners provide an array of services to help you prepare and respond to emergencies.

APAPNYC 2020 Sunday Plenary Graphic by Adam Kissick/APAP

ArtsReady makes available informational resources and an online business continuity, readiness and sustainability planning tool. The Performing Arts Readiness Project offer webinars, grant opportunities, guidance on recovery assistance, and regular updates. Both aim to help you keep your arts organization and events safe and open-for-business.

Upcoming Webinars

Webinars are offered by the Performing Arts Readiness (PAR) project and cover various topics related to emergency preparedness.

  • Networking for Disaster Management in the Performing Arts, August 12, 1 p.m. (EDT). Emergency response and preparedness for performing arts organizations can be a difficult task for individual organizations. This free two-hour webinar will demonstrate how working with multiple organizations in a network for disaster management can be accomplished. The history of networking for improved emergency preparedness in the cultural heritage, arts, and government sectors will be examined, with an exploration of existing networks. Case studies of the Pennsylvania Cultural Resilience Network and CultureAID in New York City will be presented to help guide you on how to start your own, or join an existing, cooperative disaster network. You will learn how to use the Cultural Placekeeping Guide to direct your networking efforts.

  • Safety and Security for Performing Arts, August 13, 2 p.m. (EDT). With the ever-changing nature of events, are you prepared for the unexpected? With audiences and Local Government agencies expecting more from you as an organizer, do you have plans in place to not only try and prevent, but also respond should any incident happen? Safety and Security are more important now than ever and more questions will be asked of you and what plans you have in place. This class will help event organizers and venues establish the key elements for prevention and responding to incidents of any shape or size. It will provide a background of what happens when things don’t go as planned, and show that it doesn’t matter what size or type of event you have, the basic principles are the same. We will look at what you would do in certain scenarios, and how even small adjustments to your venue can keep your event safer.

  • Crisis Communication and Reputation Management for Performing Arts Organizations, August 20, 2 p.m. (EDT). You serve on the staff of a local performing arts organization. A press release was tweeted from a local environmental group stating that your theatre’s plumbing system is leaching untreated waste into the community’s waterway. While the press release is inaccurate, season ticket holders and donors are demanding answers. And, the organization’s Twitter handle is blowing up. You have an interview with the editor of the state newspaper in five minutes. What do you say? What do you do?

See the full list of webinars at Performing Arts Readiness

Disaster Resources

Disaster Preparedness: General Resources

Disaster Relief: General Resources

Disaster Relief: Hurricane Harvey, Irma and Maria

Acts of Violence and Threats to Safety Resources

The horrific acts of violence that have taken place in Las Vegas, Manchester, and Paris remind us that cultural events can be targets. Our field partner ArtsReady recommends the following resources to assist in your preparation for and response to acts of violence.

Active Shooter:

From the U.S. Department of Homeland Security:

From the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

  • Video: Surviving an Active Shooter (WARNING HIGHLY GRAPHIC) portraying a number of different types of active shooter scenarios and how to protect yourself and those around you.

Bomb Threat:

From the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI):